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Spot On Networks Turns On Wireless Network For Residents In Block E of Queensbridge Houses

Spot On Networks turns on Queensbridge Connected WiFi in Block E at Queensbridge Houses in Long Island City, NY in partnership with the New York City Housing Authority

For Immediate Release

New Haven, CT February 8, 2017

Spot On Networks (“SON”) has turned on Queensbridge Connected, the community wide WiFi network that is being deployed throughout Queensbridge Houses in partnership with the New York City Housing Authority. The Queensbridge Connected Network is backed by Spot On’s patented UserSafe® technology which guards users against hacking, spoofing and identity theft.  The first phase of the Queensbridge Connected WiFi Network was turned on in mid-December in Block F.  Since the network was turned on, Block F sees over 2,300 unique client devices per week and is passing over 5.2 terabytes of data per week.

Once completed, the Queensbridge Connected WiFi Network will be the largest affordable housing, community-wide WiFi network in the United States with high speed WiFi access being available for all residents across 26 clusters of 95 buildings in two adjacent complexes.  The Spot On Networks Team is currently in the process of building out and testing the remaining blocks.

SON has opened an on-site customer care center for residents and support at Queensbridge Houses, 10-35 41st. Ave. Long Island City, NY.  In addition to SON’s 24/7 Customer Support, residents have the option of receiving in-person support at Queensbridge Houses.  SON is currently employing both full-time and part-time Queensbridge residents as part of their staff and has committed to creating more jobs and hiring from within the Queensbridge community.  Employment opportunities for Queensbridge residents include positions in marketing, management and networking.

Dick Sherwin, Wireless Hall of Fame inductee and CEO of Spot On Networks said, “We are extremely pleased with the level of service that we are providing to Queensbridge residents.  The positive feedback we have received from residents and the surrounding community has been overwhelming.”, he went on to say, “We are thrilled to be the WiFi provider for Queensbridge Houses and are committed to providing an extraordinary service to Queensbridge residents as well as opportunities to those looking for employment.”

The Queensbridge Connected WiFi Network offers speeds up to 25 Mbps, unlimited data usage, WiFi calling capability, seamless roaming and 24/7 customer support, providing Queensbridge residents connectivity and access to educational and employment resources.

 

About Queensbridge Houses

Queensbridge is the largest public housing development in North America with 3,149 units and an estimated 7,000 residents across 26 clusters of 95 buildings in two adjacent complexes. The contract is to provide wireless internet speeds of up to 25 Mbps to each household as well as network monitoring and management with a 24/7 help desk for Queensbridge residents and staff. The Queensbridge WiFi Network will include high speed wireless internet for laptops, smartphones and tablets, WiFi calling capability with Quality of Service and integration for the Internet of Things. The Queensbridge WiFi Network will allow many residents to save money on comprehensive data services while having access to WiFi calling using their smartphones, thus comporting with the Federal Communications Commission’s Lifeline Report and Order of April 27, 2016 bridging the digital divide.

About Spot On Networks, LLC

Spot On Networks is the largest Wireless Internet Service Provider to the multifamily industry. In addition to offering its UserSafe® managed WiFi services to the multifamily, hospitality and commercial industries, Spot On Networks has a range of wireless services including CellBoost®, a cell coverage enhancement service, and WiFiPlus+®, its wireless backbone integrated with energy management, building automation and security monitoring. www.spotonnetworks.com

 

Can your property afford to overlook resident WiFi security?

WiFi is an expected amenity in the multifamily industry and building owners are charged with deciding exactly how they are going to fulfill this resident need. Does a property offer WiFi throughout the entire property? Should WiFi access be offered only in the amenity areas? Should WiFi be free, paid for by the resident or a combination of both? What about WiFi calling?

While all of the aforementioned questions are important when deciding how to offer WiFi at your property, one question is often overlooked when vetting WiFi solutions: “How safe is the WiFi that we are offering to our residents?

User security over WiFi is a hot news topic, but ironically, WiFi users will often forgo security for convenience, despite being aware of potential threats. This is true in public settings, coffee shops, restaurants, hotels and even amenity areas. As the oldest WiFi service provider to multifamily residential buildings, we have made it our priority to ensure that we protect your residents from wireless Internet threats including: hacking, spoofing and identity theft. We deploy the highest level of wireless security on all Spot On Networks by backing our network architecture with, now patented, UserSafe® technology which goes beyond encryption to protect the resident at all networking levels. This client isolation technology ensures that your resident’s wireless devices can only see and communicate directly with the Internet, never with another device on the network. If you can’t be seen on a network, you can’t be hacked. We are also able to add multiple virtual local area networks that allow for inter-device communication for leasing staff, back office communications and IoT.

There has been a prevalence in the multifamily industry of building owners allowing cable and telcos, like Comcast, to put “free” WiFi hotspots in their amenity areas. Not only do these hotspot scenarios leave residents vulnerable to WiFi security threats by people within the building, but building owners should be aware of cable providers that broadcast a public, dual-SSID that anyone can access, even if they are not a resident and even if your amenity area network requires a password! While these hotspots can be tempting because of their low cost, they leave residents vulnerable in their home community. If WiFi users tend to be complacent and conduct banking, shopping, etc. over public networks, think about how much more comfortable they feel at your property. Is the cost of UserSafe® technology and a managed WiFi solution too high a price to pay for peace of mind?

Spot On Networks in Wired Magazine Article for Queensbridge Houses Community-Wide WiFi Network

For immediate release

Spot On Networks Set To Bring Community-Wide WiFi To The Largest Public Housing Community in the United States

Spot On Networks deploying Queensbridge Connected, a community-wide WiFi network to Queensbridge Houses in Long Island City, NY

Spot On Networks deploying Queensbridge Connected, a community-wide WiFi network to Queensbridge Houses in Long Island City, NY

New Haven, CT November 07, 2016  The October issue of Wired Magazine features an article by Gideon Lewis-Kraus, entitled “Wiring the Unwired:” Inside the Battle to Bring Broadband to New York’s Public Housing, which details the community-wide WiFi network that is currently under development by Spot On Networks (SON) at Queensbridge Houses in Long Island City, New York. The October issue of Wired was guest edited by President Barack Obama.

“Wiring the Unwired” discusses the importance of entrepreneurial companies, like SON and the development of disruptive technologies, such as SON’s managed property-wide UserSafe® WiFi, that can make communications technologies available to all at little or no cost. Lewis-Kraus also mentions the importance of the success of this project as being an integral part of smaller companies breaking into an “otherwise protected market”. The “predatory pricing” habits of telecom companies are also mentioned, which in some instances, allow telecom giants to make a margin on broadband services that can be as high as 90 percent despite offering inconsistent coverage that leaves many residents dissatisfied. Companies like SON and initiatives like the wireless broadband initiative at Queensbridge are essential to “bridging the digital divide” and making quality internet access, at little to no cost, available to everyone.

SON has also committed to employing a certain number of Queensbridge residents as a part of the city contract and the Wired article interviews two of these residents who are some of the first to be employed by SON. Lewis-Kraus states in his article, “Spot On emphasizes that it’s putting a lot of energy into working with the community; it’s not just deploying wireless, the company says, but creating local jobs to help maintain the service”.

Spot On Networks, the leading provider of managed wireless solutions to the U.S. multifamily/ multitenant industry was awarded a contract by The New York City Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications (DoITT) on behalf of the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) that has made Spot On Network the Wireless Broadband Service Provider for Queensbridge Houses in Long Island City, Queens, NY.

Dick Sherwin, CEO of Spot On Networks and 2016 Wireless Hall of Fame inductee stated, “We are honored to be bringing WiFi access to Queensbridge Houses”, he went on to say, “Along with Mayor de Blasio, we deeply believe that all New York City residents, regardless of income, should have access to secure and reliable wireless broadband. Wireless, high speed access is a utility that residents need to pay bills, look for jobs, do school work and even make phone calls. We are proud to provide NYC residents with the wireless internet access that is necessary to be successful and competitive in the Digital Age”.

Queensbridge is the largest public housing development in North America with 3,149 units and an estimated 7,000 residents across 26 clusters of 95 buildings in two adjacent complexes. The contract is to provide wireless internet speeds of up to 25 Mbps to each household as well as network monitoring and management with a 24/7 help desk for Queensbridge residents and staff. The Queensbridge WiFi network will include high speed wireless internet for laptops, smartphones and tablets, WiFi calling capability with Quality of Service and integration for the Internet of Things. The Queensbridge WiFi network will allow many residents to save money on comprehensive data services while having access to WiFi calling using their smartphones, thus comporting with the Federal Communications Commission’s Lifeline Report and Order of April 27, 2016 bridging the digital divide.

About Spot On Networks, LLC: Spot On Networks is the largest Wireless Internet Service Provider to the multifamily industry. In addition to offering its UserSafe® managed WiFi services to the multifamily, hospitality and commercial industries, Spot On Networks has a range of wireless services including CellBoost®, a cell coverage enhancement service, and WiFiPlus+®, its wireless backbone integrated with energy management, building automation and security monitoring.

Verizon Requests FCC Permission To Offer WiFi Calling

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And here we have it, folks: Verizon has officially requested permission from the FCC to offer the WiFi calling feature to it’s users.  This is huge and  means that Verizon will soon complete the quad-fecta of major wireless carriers to offer WiFi calling, joining AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint.  We called it!  WiFi Calling is the future of in-building voice – finally a solution for building owners that is cost effective and has the ability to provide data services to residents.

If you are new to the WiFi calling conversation, AT&T started rolling out WiFi calling to all users on October 8th after receiving an FCC waiver on October 6.  AT&T had delayed pulling WiFi calling out of Beta as it waited for the waiver grant which gives special permission to the carrier to forgo offering text-to-speech for the hearing impaired while it waits for Real-Time Text (RTT).  RTT  is expected to be made available in 2016.  Verizon’s waiver is along the sames lines.  There has been a very public feud between T-Mobile and AT&T over the waiver with AT&T accusing T-Mobile of not following FCC guidelines and T-Mobile accusing AT&T of simply having sour grapes over being the third carrier to offer the feature.  Drama aside, the important thing is that WiFi, an in-building technology by nature, is now able to provide a cost effective method of in-building voice and will soon be supported on the networks of all four major carriers.

There had been a lot of speculation over whether or not Verizon would be able to roll out WiFi calling by the end of the year.  Back in August, Verizon spokesman Chuck Hamby responded to an inquiry from FierceWireless as to whether or not they were on track to offer WiFi calling in 2015.  Hamby’s response then was, “We’ve previously said we’d support WiFi calling this year, and nothing has changed in that regard.  We’re just not ready to speak to specific devices yet”.  Verizon, however has been so quiet on their progress that it lead to speculation that perhaps they would not deliver.  Furthering the speculation was last week’s news that Verizon had included WiFi calling on their Verizon messages app.

We began 3rd party testing WiFi calling technologies over our networks years ago in anticipation of full carrier support for WiFi calling that is native to the device and are experts on providing crystal clear and reliable WiFi voice coverage.  If you are new to WiFi calling and what it can do for your building, please drop me a line and we would be happy to teach you the benefits: marketing@spotonnetworks.com

Stay tuned for more Verizon WiFi calling news and dates for beta and/or release.

 

 

Verizon enables WiFi calling… with a few caveats

 

Cell problems in your building? We can help with property-wide WiFi calling networks and CellBoost.  Click here to request more information.

Verizon Messages App: Get it on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/message+/id621469412?mt=8

Verizon has jumped on the WiFi calling bandwagon.  In an effort to keep up with AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint, Verizon has enabled WiFi calling for it’s customers via it’s Verizon Messages app.  Verizon’s solution, which seems to be a temporary one until VZ does the “technological work to make WiFi calling available” across it’s network, sits somewhere in between WiFi calling that is native to the phone and OTT apps like Skype and Viber.  The good news about the Verizon Messages WiFi calling solution is that the app does not assign you a different phone number as OTT apps do.  The bad news is that you need to use the app to make voice calls, Verizon customers who use the native dialer on their phone will be making the call over the cellular network.

To use WiFi calling, Verizon customers need to:

  1. Have iPhone 6, 6 Plus, 6s, 6s Plus
  2. Download latest version of Verizon Messages app from App store
  3. Enable advanced calling on iPhone
  4. Enable calling within the Verizon Messages app

AT&T officially enabled WiFi calling across it’s entire network last week after receiving it’s FCC waiver and T-Mobile and Sprint have offered WiFi calling for awhile now.  Verizon CFO, Fran Shammo, said last year that Verizon would enable WiFi calling by the middle of 2015 and Verizon stated earlier this year that they were still on track to enable WiFi calling on their networks by end of 2015.  While it seems clear that Verizon still has some work to do to get WiFi calling working natively for it’s customers, at least the Verizon Messages update will get some of their customers able to use WiFi calling – this shows that VZ is making the effort to get their customers the feature.

Hopefully the public will not have to wait too much longer to have WiFi calling fully enabled on both iOS and Android for all 4 of the top carriers.  When you look at the progress from last fall, it really is huge.  Currently T-Mobile is boasting about 12 million WiFi calls made daily and the adoption of AT&T WiFi calling is sure to skyrocket the WiFi calling numbers in the coming months.  Stay tuned…

Multi-family Cell Coverage A Major Issue – New York Times Takes Notice

This Sunday’s Real Estate section of the New York Times included an interesting article: The Cellphone Imperative: If I Can’t Text, I’m Moving, which addressed the ongoing issue of poor in-building coverage in NYC multi-family buildings and the negative impact that lack of coverage has on leasing apartments.  Solutions range from WiFi Calling all the way to DAS – but the point is clear, it’s time for building owners to pick a solution or risk losing potential renters and buyers.  See below for a run-down of the most popular solutions or contact us to discuss what solution is right for your property: 203-523-5210.

The Impact

So just how negative an impact does poor in-building cellular having on leasing and selling apartments?  The NYT made it pretty clear:

“’It could kill a deal,’ said David J. Maundrell III, the founder of aptsandlofts.com, which was acquired a few days ago by Citi Habitats.  Being fully connected has become ‘a part of our daily routine,’ said Mr. Maundrell, noting how prospective residents constantly check their phones during showings. ‘People are addicted to it.’”

Real estate brokers are also taking notice of the importance of good cellular reception inside and are saying that, for buyers, adequate cellular coverage is non-negotiable and is as much a requirement of purchasing/ leasing a home as having a certain number of bedrooms:

“’A strong cell reception is a prerequisite,’ said Michael Graves, an associate broker at Douglas Elliman.”

Apparently, even celebrities are not exempt from facing coverage issues in their luxury apartments.  According to the Times, Jay Z walked away from a long-term lease after suffering a few days of poor cell signal.  Case in point, from billionaire to “renters on a budget”, everyone has cellular coverage on their priority list.

What Causes The Cellular Problem

Unfortunately, building owners encounter the issue of poor cellular coverage simply because they are building their buildings in the best way: using energy efficient materials like low-E glass, reinforced steel and concrete.  These building materials are creating a big problem.  Material like low- emissions glass, for example, is designed the keep the elements out and heat/ air conditioning inside – these energy saving windows drastically weaken cell signal and in some cases do not allow it to pass through at all.

Available Solutions

The NYT article talks a lot about both DAS and wireless networks (WiFi), though it seems to lump them together without pointing out the differences.   This part of the article can be a bit confusing.  A DAS system simply is not an option for the majority of building owners out there due to the high cost and amount of time it takes to get approval on such a solution, WiFi Calling and CellBoost® are very different from DAS in both network architecture, cost and need for approval.  There are multiple solutions for building owners to consider and what is right depends on the needs of the property: budget, the demographics of the building, time-frame for deployment, etc all need to be considered.  Solutions range from highly expensive carrier solutions to the more cost efficient dedicated WiFi Calling solution.  Here is a snap shot of the three most popular building-wide solutions, what they look like and how much they cost (from least to most expensive):

WiFi Calling – Approx. Cost: $0.40 per square foot:

  • What Is It? In-building wireless network with dedicated bandwidth and quality of service
  • Benefits: Cost effective, same physical network provides data services for residents, supports multiple carriers, call quality in testing is often better than cellular
  • Downsides: Currently only available for AT&T, T-Mobile & Sprint (Verizon has said they will deploy soon)

CellBoost® 

- Approx. Cost: $0.75 per square foot:

  • What Is It? Uses a donor antenna to bring existing outdoor cell signal into the building
  • Benefits: Quick to deploy, carrier agnostic, does NOT require carrier approval
  • Downsides: Currently only available for AT&T, T-Mobile & Sprint (Verizon has said they will deploy soon)

DAS - Approx. Cost: $2.00 per square foot:

  • What Is It? Essentially turns a building into a mini-cell site.  Relies on a base transceiver station.  Mostly used for stadiums and arenas
  • Benefits: Provides excellent cellular call quality
  • Downsides: Very expensive, slow to deploy, may become obsolete

 

Cellular Problems At Your Property?  contact us to discuss what solution is right for your property: 203-523-5210.

 

 

AT&T WiFi Calling On Its Way – FCC Grants Waiver Request

AT&T ATandT Store, 2/2015, by Mike Mozart of TheToyChannel and JeepersMedia on YouTube #ATandT

Image credit: Endgadget.com

Hold on to your seats – AT&T WiFi calling for all AT&T customers is now on the fast track after a brief delay due to AT&T’s petition to the FCC for a waiver for it’s real-time text (RTT) feature.  The FCC requires services to support teletypewriter for hearing-impaired individuals, the RTT feature that AT&T wants to use will not be available until 2016 which is why AT&T needed the petition.  As reported, AT&T launched the feature in Beta and Beta customers were still able to use WiFi Calling during the delay.  Carrier drama has ensued with AT&T calling out both T-Mobile and Sprint for offering WiFi Calling without getting a waiver from the FCC:

We’re grateful the FCC has granted AT&T’s waiver request so we can begin providing Wi-Fi calling. At the same time we are left scratching our heads as to why the FCC still seems intent on excusing the behavior of T-Mobile and Sprint, who have been offering these services without a waiver for quite some time. Instead of initiating enforcement action against them, or at least opening an investigation, the agency has effectively invited them to now apply for similar waivers and implied that their prior flaunting of FCC rules will be ignored. This is exactly what we meant when our letter spoke of concerns about asymmetric regulation. – AT&T Senior VP Jim Cicconi

I have to imagine that T-Mobile is getting a bit of a chuckle out of the AT&T soapbox as T-Mobile is clearly the WiFi Calling pioneer, having offered the service in some form for years now.  The FCC has yet to bring a case against T-Mobile on this topic, so AT&T does appear to have some sour grapes.  There has been speculation as to why AT&T did not elect to deploy the WiFi Calling service. The FCC was not insisting carriers get the waiver for RTT and popular tech sites have pointed out the marketing value in throwing T-Mobile under the bus while appearing to be the carrier to offer WiFi Calling “the right way”.  After all, a good marketing spin might be necessary as T-Mobile is gaining a ton of subscribers with their UnCarrier model.  Green-eyed monster or not, we are thrilled that the AT&T WiFi calling feature will soon be offered to all AT&T subscribers and that AT&T sees the value of WiFi calling – or at least the market demand for it…

WiFi Calling Gets Carrier Support in UK – AT&T Support Updates

wifi-calling-menuWiFi Calling is continuing to make headlines in the U.S. and the UK with carriers on both sides of the Atlantic continuing to scramble to support the feature to meet consumer demand.  WiFi Calling has proven to be of huge benefit especially to owners of large residential buildings that experience poor voice coverage.

Here are the biggest WiFi calling news headlines from the last week:

AT&T Waits for FCC Approval: The latest update from AT&T seems to be that the average customer will have to wait a bit longer for the feature to be active while AT&T waits for FCC approval.  As we have been reporting, the iOS 9 update was available for public beta from Apple and many AT&T customers had the ability to use the WiFi calling features.  Those customers that had access to the WiFi calling feature in public beta will still be able to use it.  AT&T’s statement about the delay: “AT&T tested WiFi Calling through the iOS 9 beta and we are prepared to support commercial launch of the service once approved by the FCC”.  According to AT&T, the FCC needs to approve the RTT (real-time text) feature which is a system used for hearing impaired users.

EE Releases WiFi Calling – Vodafone Plays Catch Up: EE has released WiFi calling.  According to techradar.com, EE customers can already utilize the feature if they are using a compatible device.  As for Vodafone, network support should be available for the Samsung Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge in the coming weeks.  UK carriers Three and O2 offer support for WiFi calling as well, however it is in the form of a mobile application and is not native to the device.  The Three and O2 solutions are still an upgrade from OTT apps like Skype and Viber, however, due to their use of the phone number native to the subscribers device.  As for seamless roaming between WiFi and cellular for EE and Vodafone customers, it is not yet available.  EE has positioned itself as a leader in working on a solution for seamless hand-off between WiFi and cellular, however it will not be available until EE switches over to VoLTE later in the year.

Ericsson Announces Support For WiFi Calling On Non-Cellular Devices: Ericsson has expanded it’s WiFi calling offering to include tablets and laptops when a subscriber downloads software to their now cellular device. This new Ericsson offering follows a recent consumer report on WiFi Calling produced by Ericsson consumer labs.  The July report made consumer adoption of native WiFi calling very clear with 61% of respondents claiming to now make more frequent and longer voice calls over WiFi calling and half saying that they are moving away from OTT apps like Skype in favor of WiFi Calling.

For more information on WiFi Calling for residential and commercial buildings, contact: marketing@spotonnetworks.com

 

WiFi Calling – What Building Owners Need To Know Part III: The Importance of Network Management

Part III The Importance of Network Management

Need some info on WiFi calling for your property, please click here to schedule a call to review your wireless plan for 2016.

*Just a quick update on the latest WiFi Calling news before we delve into Network Management:  As most of you know AT&T has released WiFi calling for the iPhone with the new iOS 9 update which is currently in public beta.  iOS 9 beta is currently supporting the WiFi calling feature in many locations and new locations are coming online constantly.  If you have iOS 9 and you are unable to activate the WiFi calling feature, just keep trying, your location should be live soon.  For instructions on how to enable WiFi calling on the AT&T iPhone, check out this CNET article, it will walk you through step-by-step.*

Need to catch up? Read WiFi Calling – What Building Owners Need To Know: Part I & Part II

In the past two posts we have addressed Network Architecture as well as QOS, now we will take a look at network management, why it is necessary and what you should demand from your wireless provider.  A lot of the same issues that apply to network management for a wireless data network will apply here. As discussed in previous posts, network issues that would cause resident/ tenant frustration in terms of data streaming, can have a much larger effect on resident satisfaction when it comes to voice coverage.

We know that a WiFi network needs dedicated bandwidth, quality of service, signal that provides adequate coverage while mitigating interference and the right equipment – but what is working in the background supporting those network elements is essential to performance and reliability.  Did you know it can take 5-10 dedicated employees to properly manage a wireless network for one mid-size MDU?

What makes a good Network Management team?

We believe that proper wireless network management should be comprised of four divisions:

  • 27/7 Customer Support: A must-have. Resident and guest issues ranging from how to use a certain device to how to log on to troubleshooting problems can all cause a lot of distraction for property staff.  Dedicated, live customer support should handle all user issues so that property staff never have to lose time dealing with the wireless network.  In addition to live support, extensive FAQs, troubleshooting guides and tutorials should be available online for users who prefer online self-help methods.
  • Network Operations Center (NOC): Network operations should be comprised of Tier 3 support technicians that are monitoring your wireless network 24/7 using smart, diagnostic nocsoftware with the ability to constantly analyze your network and diagnose network and equipment issues before they cause problems for users. 99% of issues should be able to be dealt with remotely from the NOC, but when an issue that does need to be dealt with onsite occurs, the NOC needs to be able to deploy technicians to handle onsite equipment issues right away.
  • Dedicated Customer Relations Manager (CRM): In addition to Customer Support and Network Operations Support, building staff should have access to a dedicated point of contact to deal with administrative issues and get questions answered. This CRM is a liaison between building staff and the network provider, answers general questions for building staff and trains staff and building owners on network capabilities.
  • Diagnostic and Insight Analytic Web Applications: We firmly believe that building owners should have 24/7 insight into their equipment and networks as well as real-time analytics on network performance (NetPulse360 is Spot On’s proprietary network insight web application). Building owners should be able to see the status of their network, how network equipment is functioning, who is on the network and how they are using the network.   In addition, it is essential that your provider’s NOC be using diagnostic and analytic software that watches your network and is able to actively diagnose network issues before they become customer facing problems.  Your wireless provider should have proprietary software and in-house developers that are actively releasing features for both internal diagnostic and customer-facing web applications.  Having in-house developers of these web applications is essential so that if you, as a building owners, need to request a custom feature or need to request a certain type of reporting, the wireless provider can quickly turn that request over for you.  In addition, network customization, like custom splash pages, the ability to offer residents subscription based service and more rely on customized web development initiatives.

support-2014Existing Marketing Agreements and Dedicated WiFi Calling

A managed network has the ability to offer multiple tiered services to residents and guests, including subscription-based services that are implemented remotely.  The ability to offer subscription based services in and MDU/ MTU setting are key in relation to wireless networks.  Some MDU/ MTU properties have exclusive marketing agreements with Cable providers that do not allow them to offer free wireless services throughout their buildings.  These marketing agreements DO NOT extend to a dedicated voice network.  Adequate network management should be able to set up multiple Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANS), including dedicated property-wide WiFi calling at no cost and competitive, subscription-based Internet plans at cost to residents.  This model allows building owners to provide property-wide voice coverage to all residents while offering the ability to subscribe to Internet services.  Setting up multiple VLANS on one physical network is a solution that absolutely needs ongoing network management not only for support and monitoring, but for management of the subscription plans, registration, security and billing.

Network Management & WiFi Calling

As discussed in our previous posts, WiFi network reliability and signal strength are key to implementing WiFi calling as a property-wide voice solution.  In order to ensure optimal equipment operation, mitigation of potential network issues and consistent monitoring of bandwidth and voice packets, a total wireless network management solution is necessary.  Un-monitored WiFi calling in a multi-tenant, multi-residential space will not suffice as a true in-building voice solution.

Conclusion & Third Party Testing

Spot On Network has spent the last few years architecting and engineering dedicated WiFi calling networks and have begun to deploy these networks throughout the county.  Spot On’s dedicated WiFi calling solution has been independently third-party test verified as being not only as clear and reliable as the cellular network, but many times offering a superior voice service.  Spot On has the ability to build property-wide dedicated WiFi calling networks that are in agreement with cable marketing agreements.

For more information about WiFi calling for your property, please contact us to schedule a call to review your wireless plan for 2016.

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